Tagged: American League

Reminder: The Astros Are in the American League

Screen Shot 2013-03-31 at 6.51.20 PM

Enjoy Opening Night!  Don’t forget the DH Bo Porter!

-Bryan Mapes (@IAmMapes)

Advertisements

Episode 39 – Season 2 – Over/Under: Battle For The Golden Jock

Three Up, Three Down is back at it for the Season 2 premiere, and what a better way to kick off the new season than with the 2nd Annual Battle for the Golden Jock.  We’ll pick our Over/Under winners for the year and see if KP can defend his title.
Feel free to play along and let us know how you did!
Stay tuned in the coming weeks because we’ll be back in the swing of things with more podcasts and blog posts all season long.

Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and subscribe to the podcast!

or use this link to download on iTunes

http://itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=508049520

Twitter: @3U3D
Facebook: Three Up, Three Down

Enjoy!

Grade That Trade! Royals Trying to Bolster the Rotation Edition

We have our first, legitimate off-season trade (Diamondbacks-A’s-Marlins swap was technically before the World Series ended), folks! In a move that proved the Kansas City Royals are serious about shoring up their starting rotation, they traded a minor league pitcher to the Los Angeles Angels for right-hander Ervin Santana on Tuesday.

Let’s break it down:

Royals Get:

SP Ervin Santana

Cash

Angels Get:

RP Brandon Sisk (Triple-A)

The Angels were expected to either trade Santana before the deadline for his $13 million option was up, or to trade him. They went with the latter and came away with a decent haul. You can never have enough bullpen depth, especially lefties. In Sisk, Los Angeles receives a young, impressive southpaw.

According to multiple scouting reports I read, Sisk has a great K to BB ratio, a 2.60 ERA in his minor league career, and averages 10 K/9. It looks to me like he projects as a lefty specialist in the Major Leagues, but a good one of those is invaluable.

Santana had been wearing out his welcome in Los Angeles anyway – the 29-year-old never lived up to his full potential in an Angels uniform, though he had flashes of brilliance. A no-hitter in 2011 helped keep him in favor for another season and a half, but for the $13 million price tag, he was easy trade bait.

For the Royals, this is a great pick up. I couldn’t find a figure on how much of the $13 million the Angels are picking up in the deal, but I’m assuming it’s going to be around $5 million at least to make it affordable for the smaller-market Royals. [UPDATE: The Angels sent just $1 million along with Santana, meaning the Royals are responsible for $12 million – very surprising to me. Severely limits KC’s ability to test pitching market in free agency.] 

Some dummy picked the Royals as a fringe playoff team in 2012 (okay, it was me) because I fell in love with their offense. Nothing has changed as far as the lineup is concerned; I’m still incredibly impressed with Billy Butler, Mike Moustakas, Eric Hosmer, Alcides Escobar, Salvador Perez, and Alex Gordon. But what really killed the Royals this year was the pitching staff.

After trading away Melky Cabrera for Jonathan Sanchez before the season (oops), they made up for it partially by swinging Sanchez to Colorado for Jeremy Guthrie. He looked good for the Royals down the stretch, and kind of fits the mold like Santana. That is, a righty starter in his prime with dominant stuff that hasn’t quite put it all together.

The Royals are apparently going to let Guthrie test the free agent market, but I personally think they’d be smart to bring him back. He pitched well in Kansas City after coming over mid-season, and would pair nicely in the middle of the rotation with Bruce Chen and Santana.

With plenty of payroll room now that they declined their option on closer Joakim Soria (replaced admirably by Greg Holland), the Royals can spend a little bit on another starter. This blogger thinks they should try to make a play at Kyle Lohse.

I like the offense and bullpen in Kansas City, but I’d like to see them shore up the rotation even a little more. On paper, Chen, Santana, Luke Hochevar, Luis Mendoza and Chris Volstad is nothing to get excited about. But with Will Smith and Jake Odorizzi just waiting to claim permanent spots in the rotation (they might even win spots in Spring Training) and Felipe Paulino and Danny Duffy expected back from Tommy John in the second half, this rotation might be better than people expect in 2013.

Now, the Angels mostly got rid of Santana to clear up cap space to re-sign Zach Greinke. They’d also like to trade Dan Haren to clear even more room, and I’m sure they are exploring options for that right now. As an Angel fan, you’d have to like a top three of Greinke, Jered Weaver and C.J. Wilson.

But, after signing Wilson and Albert Pujols to mega-deals before last season, the Angels were a major disappointment, finishing third in the AL West. They need to do something to fall back into favor with the fan base. No matter what, you have to expect the Angels will be gunning hard to make amends and reach the playoffs in 2013.

That being said, I think both teams made out evenly in the trade. Because question marks loom for both rotations, I’ll put them each around a B+, with room to move up depending on the rest of the wheeling and dealing the respective GM’s do.

If you like baseball-related activities, follow @3u3d on Twitter and LIKE Three Up, Three Down on Facebook!

Predicting the Winners: 2012 Gold Gloves

Three (in some cases four) finalists at each position in each league for the Gold Glove awards were announced today. The award, which recognizes the best defensive player at each position in each league, is voted on by managers and up to six coaches on their staffs.

Managers and coaches can not vote for someone on their own team. We’ve seen over the years that some deserving players get recognized (Yadier Molina has won four straight at NL catcher), some get snubbed (Mark Ellis and his career .991 fielding percentage has never won), and some only win because of their name.

Yes, even managers and coaches get caught up in player celebrity for things like this. Anyway, the final results will be announced tomorrow night on ESPN2, but we’re here today to tell you who should win each Gold Glove.

A.L. Catcher:

Finalists – Alex Avila (Tigers), Russell Martin (Yankees), A.J. Pierzynski (White Sox), Matt Wieters (Orioles)

Winner: Avila

These were the only four A.L. catchers to start at least 100 games. Martin, Pierzynski and Avila all had a .994 fielding percentage, while Wieters sat at .991. While Wieters had the most errors of the group, he also had the best caught stealing percentage. For me, those nearly cancel out – I’m giving the award to Avila, who had the most consistent stats across the board.

N.L. Catcher:

Finalists – Yadier Molina (Cardinals), Miguel Montero (Diamondbacks), Carlos Ruiz (Phillies)

Winner: Molina

It’s not even close. Again, Molina has blown away the competition and perfected the art of catching. Ruiz and Montero both had good seasons behind the dish, but one could argue that there were more worthy candidates to lose to Molina. In 133 games started, Molina made 3 errors (.997 fielding percentage) and threw out nearly 50 percent of attempted base stealers (35 out of 73). Need I say more?

A.L. First Base:

Finalists – Adrian Gonzalez (Red Sox/Dodgers), Eric Hosmer (Royals), Mark Teixeira (Yankees)

Winner: Teixeira

I’m not sure what Hosmer is doing as a finalist, since he had the second lowest fielding percentage for qualifying first basemen in the American League. Gonzalez and Teixeira both have a reputation for being smooth fielders, and proved so again this season. I give the edge to the Yankee first baseman because he made one less error in many more chances. And now we’ve avoided the awkwardness of giving a Dodger an American League Gold Glove.

N.L. First Base:

Finalists – Freddie Freeman (Braves), Adam LaRoche (Nationals), Joey Votto (Reds)

Winner: LaRoche

The Nationals most consistent player isn’t just a home run hitter. The guy can play a mean first base, and proved it this year. You’d never guess who the best defensive statistics among first base qualifiers belonged to in 2012 (Spoiler: It’s Carlos Lee…WHAT?), but LaRoche was right there with him. He edges Votto because LaRoche played in more games and had a slightly better fielding percentage.

A.L. Second Base:

Finalists – Dustin Ackley (Mariners), Robinson Cano (Yankees), Dustin Pedroia (Red Sox)

Winner: Cano

I’m not sure why Ackley got the nod over the likes of Gordon Beckham or Jason Kipnis, but none of them would compete with Cano and Pedroia here anyway. They tied for the best fielding percentage in the league at .992, and though Pedroia turned more double plays, Cano has the better range. Both are good for one highlight play a night, but I think the vote will go to the Yankees star.

N.L. Second Base:

Finalists – Darwin Barney (Cubs), Aaron Hill (Diamondbacks), Brandon Phillips (Reds)

Winner: Barney

All three of these guys certainly deserve to be here, but even if Mark Ellis had played a full, healthy season for the Dodgers he would have been snubbed. Sigh. Though Hill and Phillips and their .992 fielding percentages are very impressive, you can’t discount Barney’s ridiculous errorless streak in Chicago. Any other year, Phillips defends his title.

A.L. Third Base:

Finalists – Adrian Beltre (Rangers), Brandon Inge (Tigers/A’s), Mike Moustakas (Royals)

Winner: Beltre

Brandon Inge didn’t even qualify at third base, technically. While that doesn’t mean he can’t be voted for, it’s a strange selection. How about the third best fielding percentage in the league for Miguel Cabrera? Give him the spot as a finalist. Alas, it wouldn’t matter. Moustakas has a lot of Gold Gloves in his future, but he might have to wait for Beltre and his league-leading 8 errors to retire.

N.L. Third Base:

Finalists – Chase Headley (Padres), Aramis Ramirez (Brewers), David Wright (Mets)

Winner: Headley

This is the closest race so far, as all three of these guys are grouped tightly way ahead of the rest of the pack at their position. Ramirez had a .977 fielding percentage, Headley had a .976, and Wright had a .974 this year…so how do you choose? Even though Ramirez had the best percentage, Headley had 125 more chances and only made 3 more errors, plus his range factor was the best in the league.

A.L. Shortstop:

Finalists – Elvis Andrus (Rangers), J.J. Hardy (Orioles), Brendan Ryan (Mariners)

Winner: Hardy

Look, all three of these guys are good shortstops, but it’s inexplicable that Jhonny Peralta was left off this. He only made 7 errors all season! Andrus had a worse fielding percentage than Derek Jeter, so he’s out right off the bat. Ryan is one of the most exciting shortstops in baseball and can grow a great mustache. Sorry Seattle fans, that’s not enough – Hardy and his league-leading 6 errors take the cake here.

N.L. Shortstop:

Finalists – Zack Cozart (Reds), Ian Desmond (Nationals), Jose Reyes (Marlins), Jimmy Rollins (Phillies)

Winner: Rollins

It’s really a three-horse race between Cozart, Reyes and Rollins (the Mets’ Ruben Tejada should have had Desmond’s spot), and I’m giving it to the wily vet in Philadelphia for having the most impressive all-around defensive numbers at the position. Cozart is definitely a future winner though. As for anyone calling for Brandon Crawford? Yes, he had a great postseason defensively, but also had the second-most errors and third-worst fielding percentage in the league.

A.L. Left Field:

Finalists – Alex Gordon (Royals), Desmond Jennings (Rays), David Murphy (Rangers)

Winner: Gordon

Let me explain myself – major props to Jennings (0 errors this year) and Murphy (1 error), but Gordon and his 2 errors are going to win his second consecutive Gold Glove. Yes, you have to be able to catch the ball and all three players do that supremely well. But you need to have an arm too, and Gordon blew away the competition with 17 outfield assists in 2012.

N.L. Left Field:

Finalists – Ryan Braun (Brewers), Carlos Gonzalez (Rockies), Martin Prado (Braves)

Winner: Prado

This is definitely the most messed up voting by the managers and coaches so far, as these three were the bottom three performers among qualifiers at their position. Surprisingly enough, the two strongest candidates were Jason Kubel and Alfonso Soriano. Prado gets the edge for making half as many errors as Braun and having the most outfield assists of the three.

A.L. Center Field:

Finalists – Austin Jackson (Tigers), Adam Jones (Orioles), Mike Trout (Angels)

Winner: Trout

It should be Jackson, but will be Trout. Jackson had better numbers across the board defensively, though not by much. Trout only had 2 outfield assists, but made just 2 errors (Jackson had 1) and robbed at least four home runs. Surprisingly, Jones was one of the worst statistical center fielders, even though he’s extremely athletic out there. Again, it should be Jackson’s Gold Glove, but no way Trout won’t add this to his trophy case.

N.L. Center Field:

Finalists – Michael Bourn (Braves), Andrew McCutchen (Pirates), Drew Stubbs (Reds)

Winner: McCutchen

Angel Pagan, Carlos Gomez and Cameron Maybin all have stronger cases for this award than Stubbs, but for some reason managers and coaches LOVE the Reds’ defense (MLB-best 6 finalists). Neither Bourn nor McCutchen had many outfield assists, but both were stellar defensively. Even though the award should probably go to Jon Jay of St. Louis, it’ll be McCutchen edging out Bourn because of one less error.

A.L. Right Field:

Finalists – Shin-Soo Choo (Indians), Jeff Francoeur (Royals), Josh Reddick (A’s)

Winner: Francoeur

Reddick was a revelation in all facets of the game, making some of the most eye-popping plays of the year for the A’s in 2012, but 5 errors will outweigh his high range factor and 14 assists. It’s especially difficult to compete with Francoeur, who had less errors and a league-leading 19 assists. Choo had a great fielding percentage, but didn’t throw enough guys out to compete. That means the Royals’ corner outfielders threw out 36 guys on the base paths combined this year. Wow.

N.L. Right Field:

Finalists – Jay Bruce (Reds), Andre Ethier (Dodgers), Jason Heyward (Braves)

Winner: Heyward

Etheir won his Gold Glove in 2011 because he didn’t make an error all season and had a lot of outfield assists. His numbers declined a bit in 2012, but he was still worthy of a final spot. Bruce on the other hand? That spot should have definitely gone to Justin Upton or Carlos Beltran. Even tho Ethier had less errors and a slightly better fielding percentage than Heyward, you have to give J-Hey the Gold Glove for his 11 outfield assists this year, which was tops in the league.

A.L. Pitcher:

Finalists – Jeremy Hellickson (Rays), Jake Peavy (White Sox), C.J. Wilson (Angels)

Winner: Peavy

Ah, the most random and pointless Gold Glove award. Don’t get me wrong, it’s important for pitchers to field their positions cleanly, but if we are talking about numbers, there is about a 37-way tie in each league. Technically, the most impressive line goes to Hiroki Kuroda of the Yankees, but his name doesn’t appear. Among the three finalists, Peavy had the least errors and most double  plays turned.

N.L. Pitcher:

Finalists – Bronson Arroyo (Reds), Mark Buehrle (Marlins), Clayton Kershaw (Dodgers)

Winner: Buehrle

All three of these guys are widely known for fielding their positions well, and while I’d love to give my boy Kershaw some love, I’ll let him keep his 2011 Cy Young Award and 2012 Roberto Clemente Award to themselves. All 3 guys made 0 errors this year, but Buehrle dominated in range factor and turned the most double plays. And making this play in 2010 earned him free Gold Gloves for the rest of his life. Geez, still the coolest play ever!

Let us know in the comments if you think these picks are correct. Did we goof on any? Don’t forget to follow @3u3d on Twitter and LIKE Three Up, Three Down on Facebook!

– Jeremy Dorn (@Jamblinman)

Episode 32 – Cardinals, Tigers, and Giants! Oh My!

Three Up Three Down is back to break down all the postseason action! We discuss our favorite Division Series and who we think will take the Championship Series all the way to the World Series.  Not only that, Mapes turns the tables in our “Defend Yo Self” segment where the guys back up their Rookie of the Year and Cy Young picks. Let us know what you think!

Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and subscribe to the podcast!

or use this link to download on iTunes

http://itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=508049520

Twitter: @3U3D
Facebook: Three Up, Three Down

Enjoy!

The 3U3D Awards: Rookie of the Year Edition

Rookie of the Year, in the American League it’s the easiest call on the board. However, in the National League there are a few players that have a chance at taking home the hardware. Here’s who 3U3D picked for the best rookie in each league.

American League

Jeremy Dorn (@Jamblinman): If I could list Trout as first, second and third for this category, I would. No disrespect to Cespedes, Chen, or guys like Jarrod Parker, Will Middlebrooks, and Brett Lawrie…but this is going to be a unanimous decision. The only real question is whether Trout receives a nice, shiny, MVP trophy to go along with his Rookie of the Year.

Angelo Fileccia (@GODF_TH_R): Not much needs to be said about why Trout is the AL ROY considering he’s close to an MVP. Yu had a stellar year and probably would have won ROY if it wasn’t for Mike Trout.

Brian Boynton (@GingaBeard_Man): Is there anyone else that can win this award or will even get first place votes other than Mike Trout? There is no way he doesn’t win this award. Led the AL in steals, he is the youngest member of the 30/30 club and hit well above .300 doing this while being 20 for much of the season and missing the first month before being called up. Yoenis Cespedes had a very good rookie season and would win this award in most seasons but he was second in almost every offensive category only behind Trout. Had Yu Darvish not faded for much of the middle months of the season there could actually be a debate as to who should win. He started the season very strong faded in the hottest months of the season and finished strong his team winning his last 6 regular season starts.

Kurt Peter (@FalconKP): There’s not much to be said for AL ROY. Mike Trout is a destroyer. As for the other two spots on my ballot, it’s hard to argue against Yu Darvish and Yoenis Cespedes. Darvish led all rookies in Ks and tied Wade Miley for wins. Did I mention the 2nd closest guy in Ks had almost 50 less? It was a no brainer. Yoenis Cespedes also turned heads with his performance all season. Posting a .292 average with all of the hype and money being thrown at him wasn’t easy. Not only that, he led them to the late playoff surge behind Billy Beane’s magic that is ‘Moneyball’. A truly memorable season for the A’s and Cespedes.

Bryan Mapes (@IAmMapes): My thoughts are Mike Trout is the clear one. Yoenis Cespedes is the clear #2. That leaves my 3rd place vote and it comes down to the best rookie pitcher in the American League. I’m basing this partly on ERA+ which factors in ballpark and opponents and partly on my own observations. Hisashi Iwakuma 118, Yu Darvish 116, Scott Diamond 115, Jarrod Parker 114, Tommy Milone, 106, Wei-Yin Chen 105, and Matt Moore 100. I’m giving the edge to Parker who helped the A’s to the AL West title. Iwakuma didn’t throw enough innings, Darvish was a little too wild, and Diamond was so close, but couldn’t pull the trigger.

National League

Bryan Mapes (@IAmMapes): I’m proud of 3U3D for not giving into the hype and just handing Bryce Harper the N.L. Rookie of the Year. It’s hard comparing apples and oranges in the hitter (Harper) vs. pitcher (Miley), but I truly believe that Miley was the best rookie this season. Miley led National League rookies in wins, ERA, WHIP, innings pitched, and strikeouts. He was heads and shoulders above any N.L. rookie pitcher. I can’t make the same case for Harper, where other hitters like Frazier, Aoki, Rosario, Zack Cozart, Yonder Alonso, and even Anthony Rizzo had comparable numbers.

Kurt Peter (@FalconKP): The NL ROY race is all about what you prefer. Are you a fan of phenoms? Pitching? Consistency? For me, I only had a little bit of Harper fever in me, that’s why he landed 2nd in my ballot. When looking at consistency and value added for the team, no one did it better all season than Norichika Aoki. He never slumped below a monthly BA of .260 and ended the season T-20th in the NL in BA. Not only that, he stole 30 bases, fielded his position with only 2 errors, and ignited the Brewers comeback late in the season by slugging .536 in September. Miley no doubt put up a great season for the Diamondbacks, but as a whole, his stats don’t speak to me as much. Pitching is valuable, but he certainly wasn’t dominant in Ks and lost a few too many games to get me to put him up a little higher.

Brian Boynton (@GingaBeard_Man): Wade Miley led the NL rookies in wins, ERA, WHIP, and strikeouts. I know he played for Diamondbacks, but after a dismal season they need something to look forward to next season. Plus as a pitcher he directly resulted in the outcome of more games than a positional player which is why he gets my vote. Wilin Rosario put up video game like numbers leading NL rookies in home runs, 28, and RBI, 71. His power numbers will be slightly skewed playing in hitter friendly Coors Field. He will be hitting in the middle of that lineup for a long time coming. The other rookie to make his debut the same day that Trout did is Bryce Harper and his numbers were very good. He hit .270 with 22 home runs and 59 RBI. When he was called up he was my choice to win this award because he has been a household name for the last three or four years.

Angelo Fileccia (@GODF_TH_R): Bryce Harper had a September to remember hitting .330/.398/.651 and overtaking the NL ROY lead. Wade Miley was efficient for a rookie, but had a mediocre September which allowed Harper to sneak into the top spot.

Jeremy Dorn (@Jamblinman): I have a bad feeling that Harper is going to take this award because of name recognition. That would be an absolute travesty, because Miley has been not only the best rookie pitcher in baseball this season, but one of the best regardless of experience. He has been the one rock solid constant on the Diamondbacks staff this year, and deserves the award, hands down. All apologies to Frazier, Michael Fiers, Norichika Aoki and Wilin Rosario, but you picked a bad year to burst onto the scene.

Congrats to Mike Trout and Wade Miley on winning the 3U3D Rookie of the Year awards!

You’ve seen our ballots? Hate them? Love them? Let us know in the comments or yell at us on Twitter, all of our handles are right there. Don’t forget to vote in the polls below! And if you like what you see, follow @3u3d on Twitter or LIKE Three Up, Three Down on Facebook!

Episode 28 – So A Brewer And A Philly Walk Into A Bar…

This week’s episode is quick and to the point. We discuss a bit about instant replay, Stephen Strasburg’s Innings Limit, and give you your Fantasy Baseball playoff push pickups. May you win all of your leagues! We also touch on the surging playoff races as the Brewers and Phillies are closing the gap for the Wild Card quickly.

Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and subscribe to the podcast!

or use this link to download on iTunes

http://itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=508049520

Twitter: @3U3D
Facebook: Three Up, Three Down

Enjoy!