Tagged: Orioles

2014 MLB Bobblehead Battle: AL East

Time to finish up the American League with the American League East where the Red Sox finally bring back bobblehead giveaways in 2014.  While you’re here check out the AL Central and AL West bobblehead battles.  As a reminder, each bobblehead will be rated 1-5 stars based on quality of subject, originality, number available, and overall awesomeness.  Teams will be ranked by total stars, so the more giveaways (especially quality ones) the better.

Boston Red Sox (all fans in attendance)

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Monday, April 7th, David Ortiz: You couldn’t ask for a better Red Sox player to start the bobblehead giveaways with.  This would’ve been a perfect ***** if it had been of Ortiz raising his fist telling Boston to stay strong.  Red Sox are going to rate highly giving these away to every fan. ****

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Wednesday, April 30th, Dustin Pedroia: And if you were going to pick a 2nd player on the current Red Sox to immortalize on a bobblehead, it would be former AL MVP Dustin Pedroia.  Better have real dirt stains! ***1/2

Tuesday, September 9th, Pedro Martinez: Come on Red Sox!  No bobbling goodness in May, June, July, or August?  For shame!  You get some redemption with the best pitcher in Red Sox history and the man who asks “Who is Karim Garcia?” ***1/2

Total: 11 stars

New York Yankees (18,000 fans)

Thursday, June 19th, Mark Teixeira: Yankees bobbleheads in 2013 were a murderer’s row (unfortunately not the actual Murderer’s Row) with Derek Jeter, Hideki Matsui, Yogi Berra, and Mariano Rivera.  This years crop?  Not so much, starting off with the oft-injured Yankees first baseman. **

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Wednesday, July 2nd, Lou Gehrig: I love this bobblehead and is by far the best one in the Yankees crop.  It celebrates the 75th anniversary of Lou Gehrig’s “luckiest man” speech, it’s a must have, especially if you can get the Twins one to pair with it.  ****1/2

Sunday, July 27th, Paul O’Neill: A solid Yankees player that has found a home in the YES broadcasts with the team, so he’ll be in attendance for this one.  Don’t think there will be as much excitement for this one than Matsui last year. ** 1/2

Wednesday, August 20th, Joe Girardi: Has Yankees World Series rings as a player and as a manager and is worthy of a bobblehead, but I can’t get too excited for it.  **

Total: 11 stars

Tampa Bay Rays (20,000 fans)

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Saturday, April 5th, Wil Myers Rookie of the Year: I just like the way that this bobblehead looks.  Props to the AL East for having larger giveaway numbers.  ***

Friday, May 23rd, Alex Cobb Military Themed: I’m interested to see how this one ends up looking, but it sounds pretty solid.  For now, though. ** 1/2

Saturday, September 6th, Evan Longoria 80’s Hair Band: Another Rays bobblehead that I need to see to believe.  I want to have faith that this is going to be spectacular though.  *** 1/2

Total: 9 stars

Toronto Blue Jays (20,000 fans)

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Sunday, April 27th, R.A. Dickey: This Dickey bobblehead would’ve meant more if he had repeated his 2012 performance north of the border, but it’s a good effort and he deserves it.  ** 1/2

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Sunday, June 8th, Jose Reyes: I can basically say the same thing for Reyes that I said for Dickey, right? ** 1/2

Sunday, August 24th, Mark Buerhle: Let the 2013 Blue Jays disappointment bobblehead train continue! **

Total: 8 stars

Baltimore Orioles (Promotion schedule not posted as of 3/7)

What do you think is the best bobblehead collection in the AL East?  Let us know in the comments!

-Bryan Mapes (@IAmMapes)

Money Reigns Supreme…Even on Mother’s Day

According to CSNBaltimore.com Orioles insider Rich Dubroff, MLB is not allowing Nick Markakis and Trevor Plouffe to use specialized bats with pink labels this Sunday to celebrate Mother’s Day and symbolize the fight against cancer. Check out the tweet here:

Before we get all up in arms and send a screaming, pitchfork-wielding mob to the Commissioner’s office, there may be a reason that the idea was rejected:

I’m not one to go back on my word or break off a contract, but this seems to fall under the category of “special exemption,” especially given that both players’ mothers have survived cancer. To me, it looks like a very cool, coordinated effort by Markakis and Plouffe to make MLB Mother’s Day even more unique and intimate.

The money and the media attention should focus on Louisville Slugger per the terms of the agreement, but it would be very nice to see a one-time exception made for Markakis and Plouffe. Can those two not at least use the same bats as other players and write their own message on to the wood?

As politically correct as the rules are, this sucks. Thoughts?

– Jeremy Dorn (@Jamblinman)

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3U3D Break it Down: The A.L. East

A ton happened in the American League East this offseason, the Blue Jays traded for and signed everybody under the sun, the Yankees can’t stay healthy, the Red Sox have a new manager, the Rays said goodbye to James Shields and hello to Wil Myers, and well the Orioles, they didn’t do much.  Who will win possibly the most unpredictable division in the Majors?  Let’s take a look!

Projected Order of Finish: Tampa Bay Rays, Toronto Blue Jays, Boston Red Sox, New York Yankees, Baltimore Orioles

Why the Rays could win the A.L. East: Let’s start off with defending Cy Young winner David Price anchoring a young and talented starting rotation.  James Shields may be gone, but there is still plenty of firepower with maturing Matt Moore, Jeremy Hellickson, Alex Cobb, and Jeff Niemann.  Not to mention Chris Archer and Jake Odorizzi waiting in the wings.  The bullpen is the best in the division with Fernando Rodney coming off the lowest ERA in the history of the league, plus excellent setup men in Joel Peralta and Jake McGee.  We’re still waiting on the superstar break out season from Evan Longoria.  If it happens in 2013, the Rays are in great shape.  I’ve also now gone this entire paragraph without mentioning Joe Maddon, who is the best manager in the game today.

Why the Rays wouldn’t win the the A.L. East:  The young rotation guys aren’t quite ready.  Evan Longoria spends more than half the season on the disabled list like in 2012.  Fernando Rodney reverts back to the Fernando Rodney before 2012 and doesn’t carry over the “magic plantain” powers from the World Baseball Classic.  Desmond Jennings still isn’t ready to take the next step.  Yunel Escobar gets himself in trouble.  The Blue Jays really are that good.

Why the Blue Jays could win the A.L. East: The talent the Jays assembled is the best that they’ve had since their 1993 World Series championship team.  The starting rotation is talented and experienced with Cy Young award winner R.A. Dickey, the spectacular, but oft-injured Josh Johnson, the bulldog Mark Buerhle, and “awesome when his stuff is on” Brandon Morrow.  It’s not just the rotation that’s revamped though.  Jose Reyes now sits atop an explosive lineup with two-time home run champion Jose Bautista and WBC teammate Edwin Encarnacion, who hit 42 home runs last season.  The Jays also added Melky Cabrera, who was leading the National League in batting average, before he was suspended for fifty games.

Why the Blue Jays wouldn’t win the A.L. East:  It’s not very often the team built to succeed immediately actually succeeds.  Just ask the Angels and the Marlins last year.  The bullpen still has a ton of question marks.  Is Casey Janssen ready to be a big-time closer on a winning team?  Is Sergio Santos completely healthy?  Can Darren Oliver keep it up at 42 years-old?  The Blue Jays better hope the answer is yes to two of three of those.  Edwin Encarnacion could have had a fluke season instead of a breakout one.  Plus, can Colby Rasmus and Adam Lind keep their heads on straight and hit the way they were supposed to as highly touted prospects?

Why the Red Sox could win the A.L. East:  First off, maybe they really just disliked Bobby Valentine so much that they went into tanking mode to ensure he was gone.  John Farrell will provide an upgrade in the dugout and in the clubhouse.  Jon Lester looks ready to return to form after a terrible 2012.  The lineup is solid enough, especially when David Ortiz is healthy.  Shane Victorino provides enough of a clubhouse presence and more importantly, enough of a bat, to keep Boston in contention.  Jackie Bradley is everything Red Sox fans think he really is.

Why the Red Sox wouldn’t win the A.L. East:  The heels of David Ortiz and Jacoby Ellsbury get the Sox off on the “wrong foot”.  Jonny Gomes is primarily involved defensively.  The starters after Jon Lester (and even Jon Lester if he’s in 2012 form) aren’t top-notch.  Ryan Dempster needs to be the first half of 2012, not the second half.  Clay Buchholz has fallen apart after showing so much promise in 2010.  John Lackey is John Lackey.  The bullpen is revamped with closer-quality pitchers in Joel Hanrahan, Andrew Bailey, and Koji Uehara, but they all need to stay healthy.

Why the Yankees could win the A.L. East:  They’re the Yankees and you can never count them out.  They rally around Mariano Rivera, who’s retiring at the end of the season, to get him one more chance in the playoffs.  The injuries that they’ve experienced in Spring Training aren’t as bad as originally thought for Curtis Granderson, Mark Teixeira, Derek Jeter, Phil Hughes, and Alex Rodriguez and they can provide enough, especially in the 2nd half.  The pitching keeps it together (minus Hughes) with experience at the top (CC Sabathia, Huroki Kuroda, and Andy Pettitte) and youth at the bottom (Ivan Nova and David Phelps).  The bullpen with a returning Rivera, David Robertson, and a fully-healthy Joba Chamberlain could be the best in the division.  Robinson Cano plays completely out of his mind for a contract and is the clear-cut AL MVP.

Why the Yankees wouldn’t win the A.L. East:  The injury bug is just too much.  The names “Vernon Wells”, “Juan Rivera”, “Lyle Overbay” and “Travis Hafner” are predominantly involved in the lineup after the All-Star break.  They stick to their payroll to stay under the luxury tax and it prevents them from going after what they need at the trade deadline.

Why the Orioles could win the A.L. East: Winning one-run games (MLB best 29-9 in 2012) was actually skill and not luck.  The bullpen of Darren O’ Day, Pedro Strop, and Jim Johnson doesn’t wear down in a bullpen than threw the 4th most innings in MLB last season.  Buck Showalter continues to work his magic in Charm City and wins A.L. Manager of the Year.  Baltimore calls up Dylan Bundy and he immediately becomes a lights-out staff ace.  Manny Machado excels in his first full year in the Majors, while Adam Jones continues his path to super-stardom evolving into a near 30-30 player.

Why the Orioles wouldn’t win the A.L. East:  The statistics guys are right and the Orioles regress to the mean in one-run games.  The starting pitching doesn’t hold up like it did last year.  Seriously though, this is the worst rotation on paper in the division.  With the lineups in the A.L. East it might be tough for them to keep afloat.

Awards Watch

AL MVP

Robinson Cano-Yankees

Evan Longoria and David Price-Rays

Jose Reyes and Jose Bautista-Blue Jays

Jacoby Ellsbury and Dustin Pedroia-Red Sox

Adam Jones-Orioles

Cy Young

David Price and Fernando Rodney-Rays

CC Sabathia and Mariano Rivera-Yankees

Jon Lester-Red Sox

R.A. Dickey and Brandon Morrow-Blue Jays

Rookie of the Year

Wil Myers and Chris Archer-Rays

Dylan Bundy-Orioles

Jackie Bradley and Jose Iglesias-Red Sox

Who do you think takes the crown in the A.L. East?  Let us know in the comments!

-Bryan Mapes (@IAmMapes)

January 19, 2013: The Day the Legends Died

Yesterday, our Major League Baseball family lost two of its greatest members: Stan Musial and Earl Weaver. Here, we pay tribute to the Hall of Fame player and manager, respectively, for their contributions both on and off the field to this great sport we all love.  Our condolences to their families, friends, and Cardinals and Orioles fans everywhere.

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Jeremy on Stan Musial: I was at dinner with my girlfriend (the biggest Cardinals fan in the world) tonight when I got the text that Musial had passed away. Immediately, I was torn — do I tell her? Ruin our date night? After letting the shock subside, I made the right choice. I told her what happened, and held her hand as she sobbed in the middle of the restaurant. Stan the Man wasn’t just a great baseball player. He was a legendary hero both on and off the field. Baseball fans everywhere, especially Cardinals fans, have reason to be devastated this weekend. What we’ve lost with Musial is above the diamond, above the dirt, above the balls and bats and gloves. We’ve lost perfection. The perfect player and person and everything that is right about baseball. As former commissioner Ford C. Frick coined about Musial, …”here stands baseball’s greatest warrior. Here stands baseball’s greatest knight.” Though undervalued as a player, Musial will never be forgotten as a man. And even though, as my girlfriend said through tears, “I feel like I lost a family member. Like baseball died tonight,” the game will live on because of men like Musial. A man who gave his heart and soul to every blade of grass, grain of dirt, and loyal fan that he touched along the way. Rest in peace, Stan.

Bryan on Stan Musial: There are few baseball players that would elicit the type of response upon their passing the way Stan Musial has.  The short list would include Willie Mays, Hank Aaron, and Yogi Berra.  Stan “The Man” embodied the city of St. Louis and was the greatest player to ever play for one baseball’s greatest franchises.  He was the model of consistency with 1,815 hits at home and 1,815 hits on the road in his career, plus a 24-time all-star, three-time MVP and World Series champion.  However, Musial was more than just a Hall of Famer on the field, he was a Hall of Famer off it.  The honor that shows how truly amazing “The Man” was is being bestowed the Presidential Medal of Freedom.  When Musial became just the 8th baseball player to receive the honor, President Barack Obama said “Stan remains to this day an icon untarnished, a beloved pillar of the community, a gentleman you’d want your kids to emulate.”  Stan Musial may be one of the most underrated baseball superstars of all-time, but when I one day teach my future children about the game, “The Man” will be high up on the list of players I would like them to follow in the footsteps of off the field.  For Cardinals fans, he’ll always be at the top.

Jeremy on Earl Weaver: The first time I ever heard of Earl Weaver, I was just a little kid. I’m far too young to remember his managerial days in person, but I’ve always been an avid baseball fan. And I distinctly remember owning an awesome book as a kid about bizarre baseball stories, and flipping to “Earl Weaver’s double heave-ho.” That, of course, referencing the doubleheader in which the hotheaded manager was ejected from both games — a feat Lou Piniella could only hope to achieve. Anger issues aside, Weaver will be remembered for his remarkable success as a big league manager: five 100-win seasons, four World Series appearances (one victory, in 1970), and a career .583 winning percentage that ranks first among managers since 1960. Widely credited for being a brilliant tactician, Weaver was far ahead of his time with defensive fundamentals and the preaching of patience at the plate — he changed the way baseball games were managed forever. Rest in peace, Earl.

Bryan on Earl Weaver: Is there a better known manager all-time than Earl Weaver?  Weaver was a fantastic manager, but his penchant for arguing with umpires makes him a focal point of baseball lore.  My dad has been an umpire for my entire life and would always tell stories of growing up watching Weaver berate umpires and getting ejected only fueling his rage more.  One of my father’s favorite umpires Ron Luciano not once, but TWICE ejected Weaver BEFORE the game.  In my time reading anecdotes about Weaver since his passing, I came across this 1982 Sports Illustrated article about the relationship between Luciano and Weaver.  I’d encourage everyone to read it, to help get a grasp on Weaver’s shenanigans from the view of his biggest nemesis.  Antics aside, Weaver was a great manager, getting the most out of his players , winning  the 1970 World Series, and becoming beloved by the Charm City.  The Orioles will never have a manager like Earl Weaver again, that’s for sure.

Two baseball icons that defined their cities got the call up to heaven.   Each have their numbers retired.  Each have statues outside their home ballparks.  Each with Hall of Fame plaques hanging in the hallowed halls of Cooperstown.  Each will be remembered by baseball fans forever.  Thanks for the memories Stan and Earl.

-Bryan Mapes (@IAmMapes) & Jeremy Dorn (@jamblinman)

Raul Ibanez ALDS Game Three Heroics

I was lucky enough to attend game 3 of the ALDS between the Orioles and Yankees in the Bronx.  It ranks up there among the best games I’ve ever attended, thanks to one Raul Ibanez.  I was able to capture the game-tying home run on video from the left field bleachers.  You can hear the fans second-guessing Joe Girardi’s decision to bench Alex Rodriguez.  Their second-guessing changed with just one pitch.

Sadly though, my phone died as I was trying to record Ibanez’s game-winning home run in the bottom of the 12th. Ibanez also knocked that one out of the park on the first pitch.

-Bryan Mapes (@IAmMapes)

Derek Jeter and the 5 Players We Can’t Imagine in Another Jersey

Imagine my poor blood pressure this morning when I woke up to a headline like THIS today.

Something like what Derek Jeter is alluding to would be disastrous if it actually came to fruition. I’m no Yankee fan by any measure, but I truly respect Jeter and have looked up to him since I was a little kid. And I just can’t imagine him wearing anything besides the pinstripes.

None of that Joe Montana-to-the-Chiefs, desperate-to-keep-playing, end of the career crap from Jeter, please.

Sure, the unthinkable has been done before – Ken Griffey, Jr. moved to Cincinnati from Seattle even though he looked like a super hero in the silver and teal. Heck, we had one happen this past off-season when Albert Pujols jumped ship to Anaheim, despite looking so damn good in Cardinal red.

But the super fan in me would like to keep that kind of olé B.S. to a minimum. I don’t know what it is…the players themselves, the jersey/color combo of the teams they represent, or just the nostalgia of a childhood long-gone (okay, I’m not that old), but I identify Jeter and the rest of this list as players who I could never, ever see in a different jersey:

*Disclaimer: Mariano Rivera and Chipper Jones not included because they are guaranteed to stay a Yankee and Brave, respectively, for the remainder of their Hall of Fame careers*

1. Derek Jeter, New York Yankees

Let’s start with the Captain himself. Jeter has played all 18 seasons as the shortstop of the Yankees, number two plastered on his back. Needless to say, Mr. November will be a first-ballot Hall of Famer and the next great Yankee to have his number retired. There is no more iconic jersey in sports than those of the Yanks, and even imagining Jeter in an Angels, Cubs, Red Sox (god forbid) or any other jersey is painful.

2. Buster Posey, San Francisco Giants

I know he’s only been around a few years, but damn if Posey hasn’t made himself a celebrity in San Francisco at Usain Bolt-esque speed. There is no way the team will let this guy walk away as long as he’s physically able to play the game. It’s really hard to predict this early, but we could be seeing the next great “one-team” lifer in Posey, who should be representing that awful orange and black for another decade and a half.

3. Felix Hernandez, Seattle Mariners

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again – if Mariners GM Jack Zdurineck trades Felix, he should not only be fired, but tarred, feathered and forced to watch Jack and Jill on loop. Hernandez is the King of Seattle and it should stay that way forever. I dig the silver and teal uni’s up there in the Pacific Northwest, and Hernandez wears it best. Plus, he wants to stay a Seattle Mariner. I’m sure Brian Cashman has visions, but I just can’t see this guy in Yankee garb.

4. Todd Helton, Colorado Rockies

When I say Rockies, you say Helton! “ROCKIES!” “HELTON!” Thank you. But seriously, Helton is about as synonymous with Colorado baseball as macaroni is with cheese. He’s played all 16 years of his career manning first base at Coors Field, and will most definitely have his number retired there whenever he hangs up the spikes. Todd Helton in anything but purple would be straight criminal.

5. Yadier Molina, St. Louis Cardinals

I know a few Cardinals fans who would actually sob uncontrollably if Yadi ever slips on another team’s jersey. And they should, because it would arguably be more devastating than the loss of Pujols to that devoted fan base. Whereas Pujols was the power and glam of the team, Molina is the heart, soul, lungs and kidney of the franchise. I know NL catchers have a short shelf life, but just trying to picture him as a Dodger or Phillie makes me want to elbow drop a baby penguin.

6. Andrew McCutchen, Pittsburgh Pirates

Last, but certainly not least, we have arguably the best all-around player in the National League. I don’t know what it is with him and that black and gold, but McCutchen just looks so right in a Pirates uniform. Maybe it’s the dreads, or the blindingly white smile, or the elegant physique over which the Pirates’ jersey falls. No matter, McCutchen can never go play for the Indians or Orioles or anyone else. He needs to be in Pittsburgh for life.

Honorable Mentions: Matt Kemp (Dodgers), Mike Trout (Angels), David Price (Rays)

Comment below if you think someone else should be considered for this list! And don’t forget to VOTE in the poll:

If you like what you see, you can follow @3u3d on Twitter and LIKE Three Up, Three Down on Facebook!

– Jeremy Dorn (@Jamblinman)

#MapesFantasySpecial For September 19th

The choices for the #MapesFantasySpecial are pretty slim on Wednesday, but I think there are a couple options that could help your fantasy team.

We featured his Brewers teammate Wily Peralta on this week’s podcast, but Marco Estrada has been just as great as Milwaukee has made a push for the playoffs. Estrada has given up just 1ER or less in four of his last five starts, with three of them giving up no earned runs at all. Estrada takes on a Pirates squad that he gave up just one earned run in seven innings with 10 strikeouts just three starts ago. If he puts up even slightly worse numbers, it’s a worthy pick-up that’s available in 73% of Yahoo! fantasy leagues.

If You’re Desperate: Rays rookie Chris Archer has great strikeout potential (28K in 22.1IP) if you need a boost there. If you’re worried about the match-up against Boston, in Archer’s last start he shut down Texas over 7 innings with 11 strikeouts. Archer is owned in just 5% of leagues. Reds Mike Leake (10% owned) has good numbers in his career against the Cubs, but gave up 3ER in six innings last time he pitched at Wrigley. Orioles Joe Saunders (12% owned) has a juicy match-up at the Mariners and has settled down since getting roughed up in his first start with Baltimore. Unfortunately, he’s going up against King Felix, so don’t go in expecting a win. John Lannan (4% owned) was great in his 1st start back in place of Stephen Strasburg tossing 5.2 shutout innings. The Dodgers lineup still hasn’t been great and Lannan is 4-1 in his career against Los Angeles. Don’t expect to get many strikeouts though.

If You’re Desperate Rankings: Archer, Saunders, Leake, Lannan

Good luck in your fantasy leagues!

9/18 4 PM Update: Mets pitcher Matt Harvey was scratched from his start Tuesday night and will start Wednesday 9/19 instead. I like him more than any of these.

-Bryan Mapes (@IAmMapes)